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Wellesley College News 

Entered as second-class matter November 17, 1916, at the Post Office at Wellesley Branch, Boston, Mass., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



VOL. XXIX. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., OCTOBER 6, 1920. 



No. * ■ 



CHANGES IN THE POINTING 
SYSTEM 



m 



The following- notices and additions, 
have been made in the list of "Eatings 
of Offices" in the Gray Book: 

1. Athletic Association. 

Chairman General Arrangements 
Float 4 

Member Pageant Committee Com- 
mittee Float 2 

2. Barnswallows Association. 
President 9 
Vice President 6 
Business Manager 6 
Chairman of Scentery 6 
Chairman of Costumes 6 
Secretary 1 
Chairman of Lighting i 
Chairman of Properties 4 
Chairman of Major Plays 4 
Treasurer 3 
Chairman of Publicity 3 
Chairman of Make Up 2 
Chairman of Ushering 2 
Member of Drama Committee 2 
Chairman of Minor Plays 2 
Chairman of Pliscodas 2 

3. Christian Association. 

Head of Conference Dept. 5 

Head of Membership Dept. 5 

Head of Publicity Dept. 5 

Treasurer 4 

Chairman Cmomunity Service Com- 
mittee 4 
Chairman Freshman Council 4 
Chairman Religious Work Com. 3 
Chairman World Fellowship Com. 3 
Head Conference Dept. 2 
Chairman Conference Committee 2 
Chairman General Aid Com. 2 
Chairman Publicity Committee 2 
Chairman Conference Com. 1 
Member Correspondence Com. 1 
Member Freshman Council 1 
Sophomore. 

Chairman Sophomore Prom Com. 3 
College Government. 

Speaker House of Representat'es 4 

Social Schedule Officer 4 

Student Secretary Entertainment 

Committee 4 

Chairman Freshman House Coun. 4 

Secretary House of Rep. 3 

Fire Chief 3 

Chairman Temp. Com. (working 4- 

8 hours) 3 

Chairman Temp. Com. (working 2- 

4 hours) 2 

College Magazine. 

2 Senior Ass. Ed. 4 

2 Junior Ass. Ed. 4 

(Continued on page 7, col. 4) 



SENIORS! 

If you know any choice bits about 
your friends which ought to be per- 
petuated, whisper them to the Leg- 
enda Board. Send us the snapshots 
you want published. Give us your 
clever verses, songs, ideas. Help to 
make your own year book! 

LESLYE THOMAS, 

219 Cazeno v e. 



m 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmtm 

SOPHOMORES AND FRESHMEN! 

The News wants two more sophomores and one 
en for its board. Competition will start next 
week. Watch for notices telling time and place of 
meeting. 

Everybody try out! Don't be discouraged by 
the criticisms of your instructors! 

TRY OUT FOR THE NEWS 



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RECEPTION FOR 1921 IN BARN 



Hisa 

AAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 



OYEZ! OYEZ! 



Try-Outs for the first Barn play come next week. 
Watch the bulletin boards for further announcements. 
All ye who have been clamoring for Better Dramatics 
come out and give us a chance to choose 0'ir Cast from the 
best representative talent in college. 



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SENIOR OFFICERS CHOSEN ALL COLLEGE PICTURE 



At the class meeting this past week 
the following senior class officers were 
chosen to assist Constance Whitte- 
more and Helen Cope, president and 
vice president. 

Recording Secretary Mary Scofield 
Corresponding Secretary Alice Joy 
Treasurer Carita Bigelow 

Song Leader Virginia French 

Executive Board Edith Mayne 

Henriette Bohmfak 
Eugenia Brown 



VOLUNTEER HELP NEEDED 
ASSOCIATED CHARITIES 

Actual experience as a Friendly Vis- 
itor of the Associated Charities, with 
bread and butter questions as they 
effect an Italian ditch-digger, who is 
perhaps struggling to support a fam- 
ily of five children on a weekly wage 
of $24.00, makes "Economics" tremen- 
dously real and also casts illuminating 
side-lights on questions of nutrition, 
housing and the high cost of overalls. 
Not only to young women who may 
wish to make social work their pro- 
fession or desire to serve their com- 
munity in modern ways, but to all 
who are eager to reap as rich a har- 
vest as possible from their college 
courses, should the opportunity to en- 
list as a Friendly Visitor in the Asso- 
ciated Charities make potent appeal. 



For the first time in the history of 
Weliesley, a picture of the entire col- 
lege was taken on Tower Court Hill. 
Monday morning. Mr. Young of 
Evanston, who takes many college 
photographs, offered, during the sum- 
mer to take this one. It is very prob- 
able that the finished picture will be 
used during the Wellesley campaign. 

Undergraduates who can pledge 
four hours a week throughout the 
college year for volunteer work are 
urged to make such a pledge early in 
the season. Seniors are invited to 
learn what this field may offer them 
in the way of professional opportun- 
ity after graduation. ..Graduates are 
offered the opportunity to join the 
study class as well as to do practical 
work under trained leaders, during 
which not only causes and treatment 
of family difficulties, but the under- 
lying community problems are made 
clear. Instructors and Professors in 
Sociology are asked to avail them- 
selves of the resources which the As- 
sociated Charities of Boston provides 
as a well-equipped laboratory for field 
study. Apply to: 

Mr. Stockton Raymond, General 
Secretary. 

Associated Charities of Bosto.n 
43 Hawkins St., Boston, Mass., 

Telephone, Haymarket 371 



To substantiate the welcome which 

'24 received during its first week in 

the freshmen were again 

greeted at the reception and dance 

In their honor by the Barr 
lows, Saturday, October 2nd. The 
college turned out in its annual fall 
display of new evening dresses to do 
justice to the occasion. The upper- 
classmen tried to impress the fact 
that Wellesley's method of showing 
affection to her freshmen is to push 
them into as large a crowd as possible, 
and to teach them their A. B. C's. by 
dashing violently from one letter to 
another. 

Aided by Miss Tufts and Mis- Ben- 
nett in the afternoon and Miss Pendle- 
ton and Miss Waite in the evening, 
the officers of Barnswallows, Laura 
Chandler, Mary Pringle Barrett. Xora 
Cleveland and Ernestine Weidenbach, 
greeted 1924. 

The receiving line stood on the 
stage where a large yellow moon and 
black swallows stood out on a back- 
ground of blue. The posts were 
wound with yellow on which were 
black barn-swallows. 

It was as though one of these birds 
had come when Marjorie 

Walsh, who will be remembered al- 
ways as the graceful little princess, 
'23's Freshman Tree-Day Mistress, 
was followed by the spotlight down 
the aisle which the crowd made for 
her. Embodying the spirit of all the 
Barnswallows, her dance was gay and 
carefree but with a suggestion of 
warmth and friendship in the grey 
and bleak folds of her wings. Janet 
Smith '23, also a dancer in last year's 
Tree-Day, entertained the audience 
by a beautiful toe-dance in a butter- 
fly costume. 

The music by four Harvard men 
was of almost unprecedented success. 
It was loud and thoroughly raggy. 
The drummer enjoyed himself Between 
dances by playing a game of forfeits 
— holding up all kinds of lost articles 
and calling for their owners. 

Miss Pendleton gave the freshmen 
a gleam of hope when she predicted 
that they would live to use the Stn- 
dent-Alumnae Building whose dance 
floor would eliminate the crowded 
conditions of the Barn. Miss Waite 
reminded the listening students that 
a millenium can come only when the 
charms of the woman of yesterday 
are combined with the powers of the 
weman cf today. 

Laura Chandler, in greeting '24 did 
more than merely bid them welcome. 
She told them a story, made an ap- 
peal, and made a wish. The story 
was the history of the Barn, the ap- 
peal was for co-operation with the 
new Barn plan, and the wish was that 
each freshmen go home and say she 
had had a "glorious time." 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



Wtllt&hv College jgetos 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

MARY C. DOOLY. 1921 

BOARD OF EDITORS 
Associate Editors 
CLEMEWELL HINCHLIFF. 1921 
ELIZABETH SAYRE, 1921 

Assistant Editors 
ALICE HACKETT, 1921 
ELEANOR PERRET, 1921 
DOROTHEA COMLY, 1922 
BEATRICE JEFFERSON, 1922 
EMILIE WEYL. 1922 
ELIZABETH WOODY, 1922 
DOROTHY WILLIAMS. 1922 
ELIZABETH SANFORD, 1923 
DANE VERMILLION, 1923 



BUSINESS MANAGER 

DOROTHY BRIGHT, 1921 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Circulation Manager 

AMELIA DEWOLF, 1921 

Advertising Manager 

SUSAN GRAFFAM, 1922 

Assistant Business Managers 
ALICE RICHARDS, 1922 
LUCY JOHNSON, 1923 
CATHERINE HATFIELD, 1923 



Published weekly during the college year by a board of students of Wellesley College. 
Subscriptions or.e dollar and seventy-five cents per annum in advance. Single copies six 
cents each. All contributions should be in the News office by 9 P. M. on Sunday at the 
latest and should be addressed to Miss Mary Dooly. All Alumnae news should be sent to 
Miss Laura Dwight, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. All business communications and 
subscriptions should be sent to the Wellesley College News, Wellesley, Mass. 

Entered as second-class matter, October 10, 1919, at the Post Office at Wellesley Branch, 
Boston, Mass., under the Act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of 
postage provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized October 30, 1919. 

Assistant editor of this issue, Beatrice Jefferson, '22. 

MAUGUS PRESS. PRINTERS, WELLESLEY, MASS. 



WAYS AND MEANS 



This year the dollar sign is having 
a new significance at college. Among 
the many startling expenses no one, 
unless she be indeed a favorite of the 
little gold god, can be entirely free 
from financial worry. Constantly 
there is talk, talk, talk about the High 
Cost of a College Education: yet, 
strange to say, the most convenient 
source of remedy, the Self Help de- 
partment of the Christian Association, 
is almost entirely neglected. 

In the Christian Association office 
Miss Conant is daily receiving re- 
quests for girls to do a small amount 
of housework, to tend children, to do 
cooking or dish-washing, to tutor, to 
play the piano, and e v en one fascin- 
ating opportunity to do scout work. 
And yet only a few girls have signi- 
fied their willingness to take such po- 
sitions, or indeed to take positions of 
any kind. Those who are working 
their way through college are usually 
fully aware of all the opportunities 
for earning extra money: but they 
cannot, by any means, take care of all 
the work to be done, and the great 
mass of students seem not to realize 
or to appreciate that here, through 
the Christian Association, they have 
an excellent opportunity for earning 
the multitude of I-want-but-don't-need 
things which mean so much added en- 
joyment to the year. 

There is work waiting for those who 
want it, and surely such an opportun- 
ity is not one to be lightly disre- 
garded. 



"Spare the Grass" to the latest criti- 
cism of Wellesley T s stand in the pres- 
idential election, are here made wel- 
come. 

Contributions for this column, as 
well as all other contributions, should 
be sent to the office of the News in 
the Chapel Basement by noon on Sat- 
urday. Some few important commun- 
ications can be accepted for publica- 
tion if received before 8.00 A. M. on 
Monday. All contributions must be 
signed with the author's full name, 
and with the signature under which 
they are to appear in the News. 



THE FREE PRESS COLUMN 



In every regular issue of the Wel- 
lesley College News this space is de- 
voted to the expression of the opinion 
cf our readers on any subject of inter- 
est to the college public. For Welles- 
ley's best development, an expression 
cf varied opinions , those of the young- 
est freshmen, of the most experienced 
alumnae, of members of the faculty 
as well as of students of the upper 
classes, is very much desired. Views 
on all subjects, from the time-honored 



DOWN WITH THE QUESTION 
MARK! 

In spite of the fact that there exist 
some members of the human race for 
whom the acquisition of intelligence 
is an utterlmpossibility; nevertheless, 
it has been proven that even these un- 
fortunates possess the capability of 
simulating intelligence. That is why 
I urge that those few students of 
Wellesley who refuse to develop this 
capability, should be made to do so. 
If they cannot be sensible and discrim- 
iating, let them at least cultivate an 
accurate imitation of a sensible and 
discriminating person. 

By so doing they will eliminate the 
irrele v ant question, and so produce a 
decided improvement in the college 
class rooms. 

One who makes a habit of attending 
c' asses needs no introduction to the 
irrelevant question , or its author. 
Both appear as regularly as schedule 
cards, and are equally welcome. Their 
questions (which are as many as the 
stars in the Heavens) have four main 
groups. There are the questions 
about onesself. There are the ques- 
tions about the instructor, whose life 
hoMs no point too sacred to escape the 
searchers after knowledge. There are 
the questions on the course, its prep- 
aration and lack of the same, which 
occasionally sink to the level of inqui- 
ry as to the color of ink best suited for 
written assignment. And last but 
not 'east, we have the all-inclusive ir- 
re'evancies which treat "the world and 



all that lies therein" in their scope. 
There is no limit to these questions, 
any one of which would cause an in- 
formation bureau to close in shame. 

Now altho there are countless max- 
ims encouraging questioning as to 
the true path to knowledge, neverthe- 
less the unintelligent question can be 
little better than a stumbling block 
which impedes that path. For it is a 
source of poignant irritation, both to 
instructor and to student. It occupies 
time which might far better be de- 
v oted to the subject at hand. It de- 
moralizes the class which loses inter- 
est when the lines of thought are 
broken and delayed by fruitless in- 
quiry. Even the instructor is dis- 
turbed by a flopping hand and a fool- 
ish tongue. 

It seems significant that the chronic 
questioners in Wellesley have become 
as famous as profficient exaspera- 
tions. So we beg of them that if they 
are not sufficiently intelligent to de- 
sist from their questioning, that they 
will at least attempt to emulate their 
intelligent sisters who preserve a 
golden silence rather than perpetuate 
irrelevant inquiries. 

D. A. M. '22. 



WHY? 



Why, oh why, I lamented, as I stood 
in line while the minutes crept from 
nine to eleven, why do we tolerate the 
present schedule system at Wellesley? 
Over half the student body forms into 
one long straggling weary line lead- 
ing to the door of the schedule officers. 
Rush as fast as one may after first 
chapel service, with some over one 
thousand girls rushing for the same 
line, inevitably the line lengthens 
rapidly. 

Under the present system, two 
classes of girls form the line: first, 
those who can't find a friend ahead 
who will flourish their receipts before 
the schedule offices in their stead; 
second, those who consider it unfair 
to send their receipts in ahead of 
others who stand in the line. Often- 
times girls hold as many as eight or 
ten receipts when they near the offi- 
cial doorway. No wonder the line 
moves slowly! 

The system is wasteful of time and 
strength. To put it mildly, one tires, 
of standing still in a stuffy, crowded 
corridor hour after hour, with inces- 
sant chatter and babel on every side. 
Not only physical but mental wear- 
iness results. Then there is anxiety 
lest, when one gets almost in front of 
the door, the schedule officer, who 
naturally becomes weary herself, will 
say "No more schedules" and close 



the door in one's face at ten prompt- 
ly! 

Patterned upon a vice of the present 
system comes the following sugges- 
tion. One girl from each house or 
large group might collect receipts and 
take upon herself the responsibility 
of obtaining and distributing the 
schedule cards, in return for which 
each girl would be only too glad to 
pay a few pence! But, in my opinion, 
a thoroughly practicable system sim- 
ilar to that used for freshmen sched- 
ules but on a larger scale could be 
imitated. Surely there are enough 
rooms in the "Ad" building and 
Founders Hall that lines could be 
formed under the various initials. This 
would mean an incalculable economy 
of time and strength for all concerned. 
If the office force is insufficient for 
such a system, undoubtedly recruits 
from the student body would be avail- 
able. 

If the present system prevails in the 
future, as the college increases in 
number the Bookstore may find it 
good business to invest in a supply of 
campstools to cheer the weary wait- 
ers. 

L. M. 1921 



HEART OR HEAD? 



1922, 1923, you are choosing, or 
about to choose, the leaders of your 
class for this new year ahead. You 
are about to entrust to a few of your 
number the honor, the great privilege, 
and the by no means easy task of rep- 
resentating you in Wellesley's every 
phase of life and activity. How are 
you, individually and collectively, pre- 
pared to meet this responsibility? 

Leadership of a large college class 
in v olves and demands girls of no or- 
dinary stamp; remember this. Classes 
as large as those at Wellesley must — 
and do — of necessity divide into con- 
genial, perhaps unconsciously geo- 
graphical groups. They are "split up" 
into this "bunch" and that. As classes 
they assemble on occasions only. Aca- 
demically they rate '21, '22, '23,and 
'24 etc. All very true. 

But underlying all this, 1922 and 
1923.. you are two bands of fellow- 
workers, two miniature student-arm- 
ies, as it were, with one or two years 
of common service behind you, as the 
case may be. During this time you 
have seen action together, faced trials, 
shared hardships. You have grown 
to know your "buddies;" you have 
seen them stand or fall under circum- 
stance's fire. You've another year's 
enlistment to provide for now; the 



(Continued on page 3, col. 1) 



SEND BACK MY BIBLE PLEASE 



Betty King needs religion. Will the girl who has been 
? using her American Revised Bible please mail it to her 
X at King's Mills, Ohio. Mailing money refunded. 

i 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



(Continued from page 2, col. 4) 

time has come for you to choose your 
leaders for a new and freshly-char- 
tered expedition. Are you big enough, 
are you honest enough to choose cor- 
rectly? Weigh carefully in your 
judgment the girl of your choice; 
measure her, not by the criterion of 
your affection, but by that of the need 
of the whole "fighting force." It will 
be your duty, '22 and '23, to stand be- 
hind the captain you will choose. 
Don't let .your heart outweigh your 
head. Is it to be your best friend, or 
the best friend of the Class ? Con- 
sider this, and you will send your 
armies forth, triumphant, banners fly- 
ing, to this new year of campaign. 

1922. 



WHAT YOU DID 



Last fall every one of you who were 
here gave something toward Welles- 
ley's Ser v ice Fund, without realizing, 
perhaps, how much real need there 
was for your money, or how wide- 
spread would be its use. From differ- 
ent parts of the world expressions of 
thanks have come for the help which, 
thru your interest and contribution, 
Wellesley has been able to give. Per- 
haps you have heard less from the in- 
stitutions in this country than from 
these abroad. 

Upon receiving an extra donation 
from the Wellesley Service Fund 
"Aunt Dinah" writes from her negro- 
school in Georgia, "Our meal and flour 
barrels are both empty today, and to 
think that I can pay cash for more is 
a great joy." Wellesley's check usual- 
ly reaches "Aunt Dinah" in answer to 
a prayer, she says. 

From New York Miss Maud Booth 
sends "a thousand thanks" for the 
"token of practical sympathy" which 
the Wellesley Service Fund sent her. 

A growing college in Montana, Bil- 
lings Polytechnic Institute, appreci- 
ates Wellesley's gift of twenty dol- 
lars: "You will understand the great 
value of your help when we tell you 
that it was only in the last hours of 
the last day of the campaign that our 
Fund (for $100,000) was completed. 
Every dollar had to be counted to sa v e 
the conditional pledges." 

Wellesley was able to send an addi- 
tional hundred dollars , besides its 
yearly donation, to the Hindman Set- 
tlement Schol in the Kentucky Moun- 
tains, which enabled a special scholar- 
ship student to enter the school. Miss 
May Stone writes, "One hundred dol- 
lars is a big contribution when com- 
pared with the average gift, and we 
are always encouraged to be so gen- 
erously assisted." 

"An extra hundred dollars from 
Wellesley makes us wish we had a 
brass band to sound some notes of re- 
joicing," Mrs. Esther de Long Zande 
seemed pleased when enough money 
was saved from the Service Fund so 
that an extra donation could be sent 
to the Pine Mountain Settlement 
School in Kentucky. 

From the Child Labor Committee 
Miss Ella G. Wolfe writes, "It is hard 
to tell you how grateful we are for 
your very generous contribution at 
this time. It means that the work we 





At the Other End 

of the Wire 

TWIST of the wrist and elec- 
tricity lights cities and towns, 
turns the wheels of industry, or 
affords conveniences to millions of 
people. 

But let us follow the wire carrying 
this energy to its source and we 
find either a waterfall, a coal mine 
or an oil well. 

Much of the supply of fuel in this 
country is being used up rapidly 
while the power of water is run- 
ning to waste. For the rivers 
and streams of this country could, 
if properly harnessed, develop 
enough electric power to save 300,- 
000,000 tons of coal annually. 

By studying nature's forces — coal, 
oil and water — by applying them 
to machines, and finally by the 
perfection of apparatus to insure 
uninterrupted power service under 
varying conditions, the General 
Electric Ccmpany is serving to 
make electric power cheaper, more 
nlentiful and reliable. 



(SftfEEAL EI 




planned for the coming year will be 
possible." 

Last year your generosity gave 
Wellesley a chance to do a great deal 
of real service, and to spread its good 
work over a large field. The respon- 
sibility for the continuance i of such 
timely help lies with YOU, new mem- 
bers of Wellesley and old members of 
Wellesley. Remember this when the 
Wellesley Service Fund is mentioned. 
Submitted by 
HELEN MARY COOK, 
Publicity Committee for Service Fund. 



EXCHANGES 



Princeton's first mass meeting for 
football held last Friday night was 
the most enthusiastic demonstration 
that has taken place there in se v eral 
years. 

While our freshmen were going 
through the experiences of posture 
tests, dances and receiving lines last 
week, Goucher was indulging in haz- 
ing. 

New York University, with an en- 



rollment of 11 237 students, is now the 
largest university in the United 
States. There are at present ten in- 
stitutions of learning in America 
which have an enrollment of six 
thousand or more. 

Cornell has limited the number of 
women students in the university to 
one thousand. 

The class of 1857 has subscribed 
the largest class percentage to the 
Harvard Endowment Fund. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



Drawn from 
suit shown by 



Chandler & co. 




Smartly becom- 
ing effects ' ob- 
tained by the soft- 
ly swathed basque 
coats. 

Brown and navy 
lead, followed by 
the new Nanking, 
Suchow and spar- 
row. 

Snug shoulders 
and close fitting 
sleeves, giving 
trigly tailored, 
youthful lines. 

Slighty longer 
coats with vari- 
ous novelty and 
pin tuckings and 
table stitchings. 



Price 

48 



OO 



Established a 
Century 



Established a 
Century 




Ollmnaier & (tto 



Tremont Street, Near West, Boston 

Inspiration 

In Chandler & Co.'s 

Misses' Suits 

Styles in Chandler & Co.'s Suits created by French de- 
signers inspired by the Wonderful coats portrayed in 
paintings by old masters in the Louvre 

INSPIRATION is the very word. The 
"beaux" of olden times used to array 
themselves in wonderful suits. And the 

French designers of the new suits for misses evidently caught 
inspiraiion from the charming styles seen in paintings by old 
masters of the Louvre. The nobles and great men of the French 
courts in the romantic days knew how to dress with elegance and grace. 
They knew the right fold of a collar, the proper slope of a waistline, the 
graceful drape and correct length of the coat. Thetee were matters of first 
importance. But nowadays, the young woman is the one who is particular 
about the lines and effects in her suits. A miss does not find it necessary to 
be conservative — her idea is to have the latest, the most becoming and fas- 
cinating effects in her suits. And her view of what is becoming and fascinat- 
ing agrees strikingly with that of the noble dressers of the French courts 
two centuries ago. So the French designers went to the Louvre for inspira- 
tion and Chandler & Co. went to the Paris models for inspiration for their 
Misses' Suits. 

Velours 
Silvertone 
Duvet de Laine 



V 

•t* 
♦? 

•?• 
V 

V 



It is well to have the most stylish and ultra fashion- 
able ideas represented in a showing of Misses' Suits. 
But that is not enough. There should be associated 
the question of reasonable price. 



Hundreds of Stunning Suits, $39.50, $44.50, $48, $55 
Hundreds of Stunning Suits, $65, $75, $100 to $239. 

MAIL AND TELEPHONE ORDERS FILLED 



'? 



I 



Misses Top Coats 

Soft Polo Cloth, Belled Model 

.OO 



Special 
Price 



»60 



A.STYLISH, becoming coat 
for street or general wear r 
with large collar of raccoon 
or nutria; full silk lined. 
Splendidly tailored, smart 
pockets and cuffs; shades of 
brown, beaver and navy. 
Mail and Telephone Orders Filled 



Misses Tricotine Dresses 

Fine Quolily in Naoy and Brown 

Special $-20-50 
Price 



*39 



§ TRAIGHTLINE chemise 
model, made on smart youth- 
ful lines; string belts; pock- 
ets and buttonholes piped 
with white or contrasting 
color French flannel in novel 
effect. Navy with white or 
rust; brown with tan. 

Mail and Telephone Orders Filled 



Misses Dimity Waists 

In Crisp, Semi-tailored Model 



Special 
Price 



*3 



.50 



pOR present or later wear 
with the new skirts or under 
a sweater, as roll collar and 
turn cuffs with pleated edges 
are seen to advantage over 
the collar and sleeves. 

Mail and Tekdhone Orders Filled 




THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



»•»•••••••• 



Sport Necessities! 

and correct clothes for 

Street, Travel or School 

Wear 

FEATURING 

Sweaters, Skirts 
Hats, Suits 
Stockings, etc. 

[BOOKLET ON APPLICATION] 

Athletic Goods 
Golf and Tennis 

Send for our New Fall Catalogue 

Wright & Ditson 

344 Washington St. 
| Boston 9, Mass. 



BUY IT 

IN 

WELLESLEY 

Desks to Rent 

At reasonable rates 

from 

Mrs. Richards 

5 Waban Street. 

Ar* A M FASHIONABLE 
. Ls/\lN LADIES' TAILOR 

Cleansing, Pressing and Mending. 
All kinds of furs relined and re- 
modeled. 

VISIT THE HAT SHOP 

Room 21 "The Waban" 

Up one flight 

Tains, sport hats and dress hats 
at moderate prices 

G. J. PURDY, Prop. 

Whatever you need in 
CORSETS or UNDER- 
WEAR of any descrip- 
tion you can find very 
reasonably priced at 

Madame Whitney's 

Room 23 and 25 

The Waban 

Also Dainty, Beautiful 

and inexpensive GIFTS 




THE* PARLIAMENT- OF* FOOLS 



HELPFUL HINTS 



We firmly believe that now is the 
time our new students should become 
familiar with Wellesley quizzes. We 
therefore submit these models to aid 
them at crucial moments. 

A. English Literature. 

1. Why do you prefer Beowulf to 
This Side of Paradice? 

2. Gi v e a complete outline of the 
dramatic works of William Shakes- 
peare. Compare them with The Edu- 
cation of Henry Adams? 

3. Do you consider Chaucer to be 
an example of good literature? If so, 
trace his influence upon the works of 
Rupert Hughes. 

B. English Composition. 

1. Write an expository theme on 
soviet government. Would you like it 
at Wellesley? 

2. Discuss, in narrative form? 

a. The three greatest events in 
history. 

b. The League of Nations. 

C. Zoology. 

1. Write a letter to Uncle Toby 
telling him what you have learned in 
your zoology course at college. 

2. Do you consider this a fair ques- 
tion? 

D. Mathematics 

1. If it takes three seniors and four 
juniors half-an-hour to walk to the 
village, how long will it take the 
freshmen to consume eight hot dogs 
on the way from Natick to Wellesley ? 
Carry to the nth degree. 

2. Given Miss Coombs' Tea Room 
and four hundred freshmen. Con- 
struct a graph showing the number of 
pounds gained or lost by Christmas 
v acation. 

3. How long will it take a freshman 
leaving a campus house at 9.45, to 
reach her dormitory by a quarter of 
ten? Policeman's aid not to be solic- 
ited in this case. 

E. Hygiene. 

1. Why is a calory? 

2. Are golashes hygienic? 

3. Without the heart and lungs we 
could not live. Comment upon this 
statement. 

To those receiving one hundred per- 
cent or more in these quizzes, the 
joint Chairman of the Help from the 
Hopeless Society will give a handsome 
prize of one dozen barbed wire hair- 
nets (Cap shape). 

Signed, 
Work Hard and Philip Space, '21. 



LINE UPON LINE 



'Twas lines for Information 

And "in line!" for the cashier. 

I wonder if we keep this up 
All through the college year. 

Oh, Wellesley is receiving-lines 
And waiting-lines, subscribing-lines 
Book-buying lines, and scedule-Jines 
Anl lines for everything. 

I think I've met Miss Pendleton 

At least a dozen times, 
And I am sure I know Miss Tufts 

Outside recei v ing-lines 
I've met the presidents of C. A., 

C. G. and A. A. too, 
I've bought the News and Magazine, 

I've seen some lines there too. 

For Wellesley is receiving-lines, 
And waiting-lines, subscribing-lines, 
Book-buying-lines and schedule-lines, 
And lines of type for you. 



FOOT-NOTE TO FUTURE 
FRESHMEN 



Reflections concerning Barnswallows" 
Reception 

I. 7.15 P. M. 
My Seniorite is truly sweet 

To let me meet the great elite. 
My old pumps they are obsolete, 
So fasten I upon my feet 
My silver slippers new and neat. 
And now my costume is complete, 
I hie me forth to greet the street 
Where I'm to meet my Seniorite. 

II. 10.15 P. M. 

At last I greet my luscious sheet 
With puise abeat and aching feet 
And with deceit I must secrete 
From all, my anguish of de-feet. 
A night replete with feet concrete 
And fearful neat that can't be beat 
When e v ery seat is obsolete 
And you must treat all those you meet 
With language sweet and phrases neat 
Is not the meaning of a treat. 
And what though swallows may be 

fleet, 
I'd rather they would be discreet 
And not compete to squash my feet, 
For I am not an Athalete. 

III. Moral 

Of coming Freshmen I entreat 
That if a crafty Seniorite 
This invitation should repeat 
Though she would treat of food to eat 
And of elite that you will meet, 
Fill not thy brain with vain conceit! 



TAXI SERVICE 

Baeeage Transfer 
Perkins Garage 

SUMNER FROST, Proprietor 



69 Central St., Wellesley, Mass. 

Telephone 
Wellesley 409 

CARS STORED. Let us store 

your car for you in our new 

modern Garage. Cars washed 
and polished. 

Wellesley Inn : 

has 

STEAKS, FRIED CHICKEN 

and WAFFLES 

for those who enjoy good food 

and pleasant surroundings. 

Telephone 180. Reserve the 
Chimney Corner for your Din- 
ner Party. 



Wellesley Inn 

Millinery 

Opening 
Oct. 4, 5, 6 




Kathryn's Hat Shop 

We Specialize in 
SPORT MODELS 



VENUS 

Vpencils 

"U"OR the student or prof_ 
- 1 - the superb VENUS out- 
rivals e11_ for perfect pencil 
v.-ork. 17 Llack degrees and 
3 copying. 

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I stood in line to register 
When I was new one day, 

I stood in line for my exam. 
At Mary Hemenway. 



CONSIDER FIRST 
FEET. 



THY TENDER 



L. C, 
R. H., 



'24 
'24 




THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



Alumnae department 



Alumnae and former students are 
■urged to co-operate in making this de- 
partment interesting, by sending all 
notices promptly to Alumnae Office, 
Wellesley (College) Mass. 

ENGAGEMENTS 



BIRTHS 



'14 Katherine L. Gage to Donald 
M. Hill of Newfonville. 

'14 Elizabeth McConaughy to Rob- 
ert Rea Brown. 

'14 Hazel Fairbanks, to Harold L. 
Burkhart of Southbridge, Mass. 

'19. Theresa W. Strauss to Henry 
Gale, Yale 1915, Columbia Law 1917. 

'19. Mary CummiHgs to Hays Me- 
Elroy Maine. 

'20. Emily T. Holmes to Loyd R. 
■Coleman. 

'20. Cecille K. Ogren to Paul N. 
Anderson. 

'20. May Winona Stevens to Paul 
Coolid-ge Leonard of New Bedford. 



MARRIAGES 



'12. Gilbertson-Peebles. On June 
'30, Cathrene Peebles to Henry S. Gil- 
T>ertson. At home after Oct. 1, 907 
Michigan Ave., Evanston, 111. 

'15 Henderson-McLouth. On June 
28, in Palmyra, N. Y., Mary Scotland 
McLouth to Mr. Howard Jones Hen- 
derson. 

'18 Friedlander-Krigsman. On Sept. 
23. in N. Y, City, Anita Krigsman to 
Mr. Frank V. Friedlander. 

'19. Hazelton-Scudder. On June 19, 
in Passaic, N. J., Marjorie Scudder to 
Mr. Page S. Hazelton. 

'19 Lockwood-Traut. On June 26, 
in New Britain, Conn., Francesca 
Traut to Mr. Karl K. Lockwood. 

'19 Cameron-Crane. On July 24, in 
Piedmont, Cal., Mary Crane to Mr. 
Gordon W. Cameron. 

'19. Smith-Bushel!. On July 22, in 
Cleveland, Ohio, Faith Bushnell to Mr. 
Stiles Curtiss Smith. 



'04. On March 2, a son Thomas 
Pierce to Maude Arnold Barnefield. 

'06. On July 16, a son Calvin Watts, 
to Myra Kilborn Woodfuff. 

'10. On August 22, a son Marshall 
Livingstone, to Edith Midwood Perrin. 

'10. On April 23, a daughter Helen 
Louise, to Marion Knowles Masson. 

'10. On July 30, in Cleveland, a 
third child and second daughter, De- 
borah, to Selma Smith Burton. 
....Ex. '10. In April, a son Gardiner P., 
to Martha Erwin Bullard. 

'11. On June 16, in New Bedford, a 
son Robert Girdwood, to Elsie Jenney 
Pearce. 

'12. On August 5, in Montclair, New 
Jersey, a second son, John Rodman, 
to Ruth Rodman Bauer. 

'12. On August 11, in Winchester, 
Mass., a son Thomas, to Dorothy Bul- 
lard Worthen. 

'14. On June 2, in Anatab, Turkey, 
a son Fred Douglas, to Virginia Mof- 
fatt Shepard. 

'14. On March 28, in Portland, Me., 
a daughter Jane, to Mary Calkin Mar- 
tin. 

'15. On August 4, in West Newton, 
a son to Bonnie Lillie Dunbar. 

'17. On June 5, a son to Lois Bangs 
Walters. 

'18. Tn July, a son to Margery Har- 
ris Weil. 

'17. On June 17. a daughter Mildred 
to Florence Boyden Wetherbee. 

'19. On July 2, in Chicago, 1919's 
Class Baby, Margaret, to Alice Clough 
Evans. 

'19. On July 3, a daughter Joseph- 
ine Joy, to Margaret Withrow Farney. 

'19. On July 13, in Natick, a daugh- 
ter Muriel, to Muriel Coe Larsen. 



DEATHS 



'10. On August 25, in San Francis- 
co, Eleanor Robb Patterson. 



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occasion — there is a 
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'11. On August 25, in London, Eng., 
Dr. Eikintbn, father of Mary Elkinton 
Duguid. 

'15. On May 23, in Baltimore, Md., 
Mr. J. Lee Penn, father of Alpha S. 
Penn. 

'17. On July 2, Lois Bangs Walters. 



la. Peck) to Sacandaga, N. Y. 

'18. Mrs. Kenneth Culbert (Miriam 
Towle) to 318 S. Euclid Ave., West- 
field, N. J. 



PREPARING FOR LIFE 



CHANGES OF ADDRESS 



'95. Mrs. C. H. Dempsey (Susan 
Goddard) to 279 Eliot Street, Milton, 
Mass. 

'97. Frida M. Reynal, for the win- 
ter, to 31 Sidney Place, Brook'n, N. Y. 

'00. Mrs. H. H. Rockwell, (Jessie 
Cameron) to 496 Commonwealth Ave., 
Boston. 

'05. Mrs. Harry Kissinger (Louise 
Loose) to 3322 East 150th St., Cleve- 
land, Ahio. 

'15. Murial J. Schabacker to 57 Jef- 
ferson Road, Princeton, N. J. 

'15. Harriet Mattson to 1057 Colum- 
bia Ave., Chicago. 111. 

'17. Mrs. Frank A. Lewis (Edith 
Mattson) to 1057 Columbia Avenue, 
Chicago. 111. 

'17. Mrs. Albert Pretzf elder (Rosel- 



Sunday morning, October third, in 
the Memorial Chapel, Dr. J. W. Plat- 
ner of Cambridge preached on the ne- 
cessity of preparation for the ob- 
stacles that this year is bound to 
bring. It is not enough to live in the 
present. The realization that life is 
never-ending furnishes what Dr. Plat- 
ner called "the prophetic value of un- 
finished nature." 

He named the chief enemies that 
must be met, and the best weapons for 
defeating them. Sound knowledge, 
that is based on a realization of the 
limits of knowledge, and artistic sen- 
sibility, alone can conqueer ignorance. 
Moral indifference must be met with 
moral purpose. Finally, religious 
faith is a fundamental part of any- 
one's life equipment. "It was by 
faith and it always will be by faith 
that men are moral victors." 



1923 and 1924 

Try out for the News 



lo ma\e your Rooms Attractive 
Visit the Gift Shop 

DESK SETS — TEA SETS — FRAMED PICTURES — 
THE NEW PARCHMENT LAMP SHADES WITH THE 
WELLESLEY SEAL. NEW CANDY BOXES AND 

JARS. 
DON'T MISS THE SHOP AROUND THE CORNER. 

SUE RICE STUDIO 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 










ARTHUR BYRON & MARTHA 
HEDMAN 
in 
"TRANSPLANTING JEAN" 



"Transplanting Jean," a gay and 
sparkling comedy, wi'.l come to the 
Hollis Street Theatre beginning Mon- 
day, October 4. Arthur Byron and 
Martha Hedman will appear as co- 
stars in this comedy triumph by de 
Flers and de Cavaillet, master crafts- 
men of the French stage. 

"Transplanting Jean" electrified all 
Paris when it was first disclosed at 
the Theatre Gymnase, and ran for fif- 
teen months. The American produc- 
tion made at Chicago, last August, 
has met with a very real success. All 
records for summer business ha v e been 
broken. 

Arthur Byron has the role of Le 
Comte de Larzac, a middle-aged Don 
Juan, who finds at the age of forty- 
two that he has exhausted most of the 
pleasurable sensations that life has 
to offer. A young woman laughs at 
his first gray hairs, and he renounces 
all women for all time. He deter- 
mines henceforth to cultivate the 
simpler emotions, and he remembers 
that he has a natural son whom he has 
not seen for twenty years. A meeting 
with this youth (Richard Barbee) of- 
fers his jaded senses the prospect of r, 
new sensation. The boy has been 
reared on a farm in Spain at the foot- 
hills of the Pyrenees and is a healthy 
sportsman, an athlete and out-of-doors 
type. How sire and son come together 
in Paris, and again in this country, 
how two such contrary natures come 
to an inevitable clash, how the debon- 
air parent falls in love with his son's 
fiancee (Martha Hedman) is all piq- 
uant'y set forth in true Gallic fashion 
and with a prodigality of French wit. 

In producing this comedy, Messrs. 
Byron and Marshall have adhered to 
a literal translation of the author's 
work and are said to have shown a 
wise daring — a daring that justified 
the deserved success they have won. 



(Continued from page 1, col.l) 



2 Sophomore Ed. 3 

2 Freshman Ed. "2 

Debating Club. 

Business Manager 4 

Vice President 3 

Chairman Material Com. 3 

Secretary (when Wei. is Sec'y of 
Intercollegiate Debate) 

Societies. 

Member Central Committee 
Housekeeper or Custodian 

Tree Day. 

Head of Buying 

Head of Sewing 

Member of Dancing Committee 

Chairman Dancing Committee 

Chairman Gen. Arrangements 

Chairman Music 

Member Gen. Arrangements Com. 

Member Music Committee 

Chairman Finance Committee 



ENGAGEMENT 



EUzahelh Lum, 1922, has announced 
her engagement to Ervin Thayer 
Drake Jr. of Franklin, N. H., Harvard 
1916. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



EVENING CHAPEL 



At Sunday evening Chapel Miss 
Ruth W. Lathrop '83 gave personal 
reminiscences of Mr. and Mrs. Durant 
and of the college life during Mr. 
Durant's life-time. Wellesley was 
founded by Mr. Durant in 1879 as 
a memorial to his son, who died in 
1873. While, at first glance, a college 
for women may seem a strange me- 
morial to raise to a young man's mem- 
ory, it is not so when we understand 
how interested the Durants were in 
the higher education of women. They 
saw that the teaching of the country 
was passing into the hands of women, 
and that only one-fifth as many girls 
as men were given opportunities for 
education. Wellesley was founded as 
a Christian educational institution. 
Mr. Durant deeded the estate to the 
trustees, and he himself erected a 
building with excellent equipment — 
College Hall. But he gave to the col- 
lege something more than material 
equipment. He gave in addition his 
ideals, the Christian, the academic, 
and the feminine. 

Miss Lathrop then gave a word 
picture of Mr. and Mrs. Durant as 
she remembeied them. They were 
friends of all the girls who were there 
in college giving freely of their time 
and personality to all who sought it. 
Mr. Durant gave financial assistance 
to many girls who,, without it could 
not have come to college, and was the 
founder of our Student Aid Society. 
In the autumn of 1881 he was taken 
seriously ill, and on the thirtieth of 
October he died. There were many 
who thought then that the heart of 
Wellesley itself had ceased, but Mrs. 
Durant assumed two-fold responsibil- 
ity and carried on the work of her 
husband. On February twelfth, 1917, 
Mrs. Durant died. From then on the 
ideals of the college. New buildings 
have been erected, departments reor- 
ganized, and the academic standard 
raised. Miss Lathrop paid an especial 
tribute to our own president, Miss 
Pendleton. She then gave a brief 
summary of the fields of work now 
open to Wellesley graduates, and 



closed her address with personal rem- 
iniscences of the college life in '83. 

(Continued from last week) 



Edna Virginia Moffett, Ph. D.„ Asso- 
ciate Professor of History. 

Josephine Harding Batchelder, M. A., 
Associate Professor of Rhetoric and 
Composition. 

John Charles Duncan, Ph. D., Profes- 
sor of Astronomy and Director of 

Whitin Observatory. 

Eunice Clara Smith-Goard, M. A., As- 
sistant Professor of French. 

Alice Maria Ottley, M. A., Assistant 
Professor of Botany. 

Seal Thompson, M. A., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Biblical History. 

Lillian Eloise Baker, M. A., Instructor 
in Chemistry. 

Fannie Paddock Miller, Head of the 
Elms and Joslin House. 



Girls of Wellesley ! 

Your College Room 

will be a place of memories in post-college years if 
you furnish it from the start with color and comfort 
that speak personality. 

In our great Annex, given over largely to House 
Furnishings, you will find your every need answered 
in our full equipment of 

RUGS PILLOWS FURNITURE COVER- 
INGS PICTURES PICTURE FRAMES 
CURTAINS DESK OUTFITS BANNERS 
BOOKS BOOK-ENDS CHAFING DISHES 
CHINA SILVERWARE 

Jordan Marsh Company 

New England's Greatest Store 



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SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEWS 

$1.75 A YEAR 

If you haven't subscribed do not delay any long- 
er. Each week's failure means further loss of val- 
uable literature. 

If you have subscribed but have failed to receive 
your reward, write to the circulation manager about 
it. Do not ask the editors about it — they know less . 
than you do! 




uLick^orviP 



announce 
The presentation of 

Autumn a nd Win ter Models 

GOWNS, TAILORED FROCKS 
WRAPS FURS and HATS 

will be displayed in the 

ANNEX of WELLESLEY INN, OCT. 6, 7 and 8 

Exhibitions Daily 

NEW YORK BOSTON 



1924 



ftfje Wtlk&lty 
College 4$laga?me 



reeds you. We are interested in see- 
ing what you have written. Put all 
contributions in the envelope on the 
Magazine bulletin board in the Ad- 
ministration building. 



REFRESH 

YOURSELVES 

AT THE CAFETERIA 

11.30 — 1.00 
except Saturday 

Ice cream cones 

Hot chocolate 

Sweet chocolate 

Fudge squares 

Cookies 



YARN SHOP 



"When Susie Moggridge was a 
little girl she once knitted a ball of 
cotton twice, and she har, since said 
that the change from twine to ordin- 
ary yarn was not so great as the 
change from ordinary yarn to the 
Ango Fleece." 

With apologies to Mr. Barrie. 

Learn the quality of Ango Fleece 
at the 

YARN SHOP 

12 Brook St. 

First Street to right beyond the 
Square